Can’t get hired?

So, I’m watching this movie titled “Second Act” which stars Jennifer Lopez as the character Maya Vargas, a supermarket assistant manager who wants a promotion after 15 years of using her skills which led the company into having increased sales and rising revenue with her amazing marketing strategies.    After losing the promotion to a “college-educated” candidate, Mya becomes upset and frustrated and decided to quit her job leaving the company in a bind.  She went on to further prove that “street smarts” are just as valuable as “book smarts.”

What’s the moral of the story?  Well, what I got from it while having a somewhat similar experience minus the horrible boss and wanting a promotion. It was more at trying to find an employer who would accept my experience and certifications and licenses that most college graduates had not obtained. But because they got their book experience from a reputable college/university, it was much easier for them to get their foot in the door.

“I wish we lived in a world where street smart equals book smart.”

At the end of the movie, Maya Vargas ends up proving that you don’t need someone else to acknowledge your skills if you believe in yourself.  So what did she do?  She started her own company in which she partners with other supermarkets, yes including the one who didn’t believe in her ideas.

As I mentioned previously, there are similarities in Maya’s and my story, and it’s that we both started businesses that cater to our expertise.

So remember this, believe in yourself and have the courage to create your own space.

Meals and Entertainment Changes Under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

office holiday party

OH NO! Are the HOLIDAY PARTIES still DEDUCTIBLE?
In general, the new Tax Act provides for stricter limits on the deductibility of business meals and entertainment expenses. Under the Act entertainment expenses incurred or paid after December 31, 2017 are nondeductible unless they fall under the specific exceptions in Code Section 274(e).  One of those exceptions is for “expenses for recreation, social, or similar activities primarily for the benefit of the taxpayer’s employees, other than highly compensated employees”  (i.e. office holiday parties are still deductible).

Business meals provided for the convenience of the employer are now only 50% deductible whereas before the Act they were fully deductible. Barring further action by Congress those meals will be nondeductible after 2025.


Businesses should keep the new rules in mind as they plan their 2018 meals and entertainment budgets. 

2018 Expenses – New Rules

  • Office Holiday Parties – 100% deductible
  • Entertaining Clients – Meals 50% deductible / No deduction for entertainment expenses
  • Employee Travel Meals – 50% deductible
  • Meals Provided for Convenience of Employer – 50% deductible (nondeductible after 2025)

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